<p>Elaina Loveland has been a writer and editor covering higher education and college admissions for 18 years and is the author of Creative Colleges: Finding the Best Programs for Aspiring, Artists, Designers, Dancers, Musicians, Writers, and More. Creative Colleges has earned recognition in the College Bound Teen, the Washington Post, the San Francisco Gate and U.S. News and World Report.s Annual College Guide. </p><p>Loveland has spoken at the Independent Educational Consultants Association and the University of the Arts, as well as several high schools about college admission for creative students. She has worked for the National Association for College Admission Counseling as editor of the Journal of College Admission and for NAFSA: Association of International Educators as editor-in-chief of International Educator magazine. As an independent journalist, Loveland.s work has appeared in numerous publications such as American Careers, Dance Teacher, Hispanic Outlook on Higher Education, International Educator, Pointe, Teen Vogue, University Business and the U.S. News & World Report.s Annual College Guide, among several others. She has a master.s degree in English and has been an adjunct instructor at three higher education institutions. Loveland provides private college admissions consulting to families upon request. She lives in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area.</p>

It happens from time to time -- you've started college, but you realize that perhaps your university wasn't the best choice for you after all. It could be location, cost, academics or some other reason. Or maybe you are at a community college and plan to transfer to either a four-year school. No matter what the reason, applying as a transfer student can get complicated, and you might want some help ironing out the steps you should take to make it happen.

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