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Study: Students With Internship Experience Find FT Jobs Faster

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If you've ever wondered whether an internship can truly help your job prospects, a new study aims to demonstrate that these opportunities give you major benefits when looking for full-time employment.

Software firm Nulab conducted a study this year asking 984 people across the U.S. about their internship experiences, and whether they found any benefits from those positions. Check out the main findings of the survey.


Business, STEM Among Most-Hired Majors After Interning

  • Only two out of five interns were paid, although 66 percent had a formal review at the end of their internship; three out of five received academic credit upon completing their internships
  • Some 40 percent of people have been hired by a company they previously interned with
    • About 26 percent were hired immediately upon graduating, while 13 percent were hired at a later point
  • The most hired majors after interning include business (51 percent), science, math and technology (49 percent), health and medicine (40.5 percent), and public and social services (40 percent)
  • Students who complete internships secured jobs faster than those who did not
  • About 63 percent are working in a career field relevant to their internship

Here's How You Can Boost Your Hiring Odds

When it comes to the role internships play in securing full-time work, it comes down to finding the right fit, which can easily be done during an internship, said Analisse Dunne of Nulab. "Internships and employment can often go hand-in-hand, as our study recently explored," she said. "Of the former interns we surveyed, 40 percent indicated that they were hired by the employer they completed an internship with. Remember, an internship is an opportunity to get your foot in the door and first impressions matter."

To maximize the odds of converting your internship to a full-time job, you should take in as much from the internship experience as possible, she says. "Use the opportunity to leverage your skills and develop new ones. Even if your internship does not result in employment, our study found that nearly 80 percent of managers would be more likely to hire an applicant with relevant internship experience than one without."

Ensure Communication When Internships Are Virtual

Now that internships have moved to a remote environment, students should ensure that they are communicating and collaborating as much as possible by optimizing their use of technology, Dunne said. "The landscape of internships is changing, but interns may have the upper hand when it comes to adapting to some of today's challenges. More businesses than ever before rely on technology to keep their employees connected which is an area where most Gen Z and Millennial students are seasoned. To make the most of your virtual internship, it's important to proactively communicate with your supervisor to ensure cohesiveness. Virtual internships will come with challenges, so it's especially important to take initiative to stand out."

Do Your Research

When it comes to preparation for an internship, performing your research ahead of time is key, Dunne notes. "Utilize resources like LinkedIn and company websites to better understand who is in charge of what. Likewise, inquire about the best ways to communicate with colleagues — whether they prefer email communication, chat platforms such as Slack, Typetalk, etc. and their preferred software for virtual meetings. Try to learn these programs ahead of time to ensure smooth onboarding."

Resource: To read the complete study, visit the Nulab website.